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Project Kite

Project KITE Frequently Asked Questions

"Thank you Project KITE staff!! The presentations and trainings were well-organized and well-presented with practical information for (the) learning needs of a diversity of students."
- Speech-Language Pathologist

"Excellent program! This had a great impact on the child's life. All the ideas were very helpful. Especially helpful were the ideas for IEPs, goals, and objectives."" - Early Childhood Special Education Teacher
- Elementary Special Education Teacher

"It (Project KITE) was excellent. I always looked forward to the sessions to learn more new ideas. Thank you!"
- Occupational Therapist

  1. Who is in the Project KITE team?
  2. How many teams are included in a Semester of Project KITE?
  3. Who is a focus child for each team?
  4. When are the trainings held?
  5. How many training sessions are there?
  6. Are there any CEU hours granted?
  7. Who are the professionals besides the classroom teacher?
  8. Where are the trainings held?
  9. What do team members need to do?
  10. When is the training?
  11. How often do we meet for training?
  12. What technology do you provide?
  13. Can other students use this technology?
  14. Can I use the Project KITE iPad to go on the internet or download more apps?
  15. Do we get to keep the Project KITE iPad once the training is over?
  16. Can we check items out of the STC Software Lending Library?
  17. Does Project KITE pay for substitute teachers?
  18. What is the philosophy of the KITE Model?
  19. How is the goal of inclusion achieved through Project KITE?
  1. Who is in a Project KITE team?

    Three teams of at least three are comprised of at least 1 parent, 1 classroom teacher and 1 other professional or paraprofessional. Each of the three teams is built around a focus child. Both parents are welcome to participate and additional educational professionals may attend, but primary attendance must be the core team identified in the application.

  2. How many teams are included in a Semester of Project KITE?

    Each semester, three teams are chosen from a similar Minnesota geographic location to make up the core group that works collaboratively with the Simon Technology Center KITE staff.

  3. Who is a focus child for each team?

    A child aged 3-8 with a disability who is in an inclusive classroom setting.

  4. When are the trainings held?

    The training sessions are generally held in the evenings, however training dates are set by the teams and can be scheduled any date and time that works for the teams.

  5. How many training sessions are there?

    There are five training sessions, each three hours long for a total of 15 hours of training.

  6. Are there any CEU hours granted?

    A certificate of completion with up to 15 participation hours will be issued to each participant upon conclusion of the training.

  7. Who are the professionals besides the classroom teacher?

    The other professional can be a paraprofessional, personal care attendant PCS, speech language pathologist, occupational therapist, OT, etc. There is more flexibility with this position, but it needs to be someone either working in the classroom that the focus child is in, or someone working directly with the focus child.

  8. Where are the trainings held?

    The trainings are held in the local community where the team members live. Once a community is selected, team members may need to assist Project KITE coordinators in determining an appropriate facility or classroom for the trainings.

  9. What do team members need to do?

    Attend all of the training sessions, work with the technology between sessions, work with KITE coordinator to schedule site visit, and eventually apply and share what they have learned with others.

  10. When is the training?

    Scheduling of the sessions is determined jointly by Project KITE staff and all of the team members.

  11. How often do we meet for training?

    The 5 training sessions are typically scheduled 2 - 3 weeks apart to allow time for participants to use and apply what they are learning.

  12. What technology do you provide?

    We loan each team an iPad with identical applications and other assistive technology for use both in the home and in the classroom during the 2 – 3 months of Project KITE at your location. Families and professionals are also able to check items out from the Simon Technology Center lending library for a full year free of charge. Each team and the KITE staff will discuss its unique technology needs and will work together to best meet them for the duration of the project.

  13. Can other students use this technology?

    All children in the classroom are encouraged to enjoy working with the technology.

  14. Can I use the Project KITE iPad to go on the internet or download more apps?

    Yes, the iPads are Wi-Fi enabled. However, participants will need to provide their own internet connections. The iPads come preloaded with many useful apps and features that can be used to the benefit of the participants for the duration of the project.

  15. Do we get to keep the Project KITE iPad once the training is over?

    The Project KITE iPad is available as a loan to the team for the duration of the Project KITE, but must be returned on the last night of training.

  16. Can we check items out of the Simon Technology Center Lending Library?

    Yes, each participant receives a year-long membership to the STC Lending Library. This membership is good for one calendar year from the start date of the team’s Project KITE session.

  17. Does Project KITE pay for substitute teachers?

    Our grants do not provide for compensation for substitutes. However, a certificate for up to 15 participation hours will be issued at the end of the semester.

  18. What is the philosophy of the KITE Model?

    The KITE Model has four distinct components to support the vision of inclusion of young children with disabilities. The Four Ts are:

    • Teaming - Project KITE encourages the collaboration of parents, teachers, and professionals.
    • Training - Project KITE trains participants in using technology to support inclusion of the children in school and family activities.
    • Technology Access - KITE provides access to technology for participants through hands-on trainings and through the Simon Technology Center Library. Software, hardware, apps and other assistive technology devices are available for loan to Project KITE participants.
    • Technical Assistance - During and after training sessions, Project KITE provides technical assistance regarding assistive technology devices, funding, selection, and use.
  19. How is the goal of inclusion achieved through Project KITE?

    Project KITE focuses on the following:

    • Inclusion of young children with disabilities in their daily activities within the home and classroom environments
    • Using assistive technology as tools to support children in the inclusion process
    • Providing technology access to young children with disabilities
    • Teaching new and innovative ways to use existing technologies for children with special needs